Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Teapot Talk: The Smell of a (Well Seasoned) Teapot

Waiting impatiently for the new spring green tea to arrive, I've switched from my winter preference for puerh back to oolong. Last night as I was brewing Monkey-Picked Tie Guan Yin in my favorite zhu ni (red clay) pot that I use for tie guan yin, I stuck my nose inside and was delighted to find that it has a crisp, floral oolong aroma. The gradual process of teapot seasoning is well underway!

Aficionados say a well seasoned pot doesn't need leaves to brew tea. The affinity the pot develops for its habitual tea variety is one reason that many prefer to make only one type of tea in a given pot. I've been using this pot for about a year and a half; the oolong fragrance is a recent development.

Good teapot maintenance is important to proper seasoning. Never wash the pot in anything except hot water or tea. Don't dry, wipe, or try to clean the dark tea residue from the inside of the pot or lid...it's a good thing! After use rinse the pot, buff the outside dry with a soft cotton cloth or tea towel, and invert it on a rack (I use a leaky old bamboo tea tray) until it thoroughly air dries. Use the pot regularly and be patient. Eventually it will evolve into a treasure!

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Post some pictures of your teapot!

Virginia said...

Thanks for the suggestion! Above you see my pot, with a little early patina starting to show, as it dries on a bamboo rack after an afternoon of intensive tea brewing. My experience with handsome, traditional bamboo tea trays is that sometimes they dry out and start to leak after a few years. When that happens they still look great and are the perfect place to dry freshly rinsed pots!